Survey Reveals New Insights on the Job Market

Survey Reveals New Insights on the Job Market

As the job market continues to evolve, we decided to take a deeper look into what people’s perceptions are on the current job market. We surveyed 1000 people aged 18-60 on the current state of the job market, with the goal to shed light on key trends, challenges and opportunities for job seekers. The survey included 10 questions and revealed some very interesting results.

The table below shows some of the key findings from the survey split by gender:

QuestionOverallMaleFemale
Does your job typically require a degree or other professional qualification?74.78%78.67%70.87%
Is your degree related to your job?68.45%72.02%64.85%
Do you believe a degree is needed to have a well paying job?52.48%55.77%49.32%
Have you received job offers via LinkedIn within the last year?51.12%54.21%47.96%
Have you seen an increase in skills based tests when applying for jobs?60.95%63.99%58.06%
Are you actively looking for a new job while in full-time employment?46.54%47.36%45.83%
Do you feel like you are fairly paid in your current role?61.05%67.12%55.15%
Would you prefer for job applications to be anonymous to reduce bias?66.89%69.86%64.08%
Have you ever experienced negative bias when applying for a job?50.73%51.47%50.10%
If you have experienced negative bias, what was it related to?
OverallMaleFemale
Age21.14%38.02%4.26%
Race15.93%28.52%27.52%
Gender14.10%15.59%31.01%
Neighborhood3.37%4.56%5.04%
Other4.80%6.08%7.75%

Key findings by gender

Need for a Degree

An overwhelming majority, (73.21%) overall, indicated that their jobs typically require a degree or other professional qualification. The breakdown by gender shows a slightly higher percentage among males at (78.67%) compared to females at (70.87%). A large percentage of respondents (68.45%) also confirmed that their degree is related to their current job, with a higher percentage among males (72.02%) compared to females (64.85%). While a significant portion (52.48%) believes a degree is needed for a well-paying job, the breakdown by gender reveals a nuanced perspective, with (55.77%) of males and (49.32%) of females holding this belief.

Over half of the respondents (51.12%) reported receiving job offers via LinkedIn within the last year, with a slightly higher percentage among males (54.21%) compared to females (47.96%). A majority (60.95%) also noted an increase in skills-based tests when applying for jobs, with a higher percentage among males (63.99%) compared to females (58.06%).

Employee Perspectives

Nearly half of the respondents (46.54%) admitted to actively looking for a new job while employed full-time. 61.05% also expressed satisfaction with their current salaries. The breakdown by gender reveals a disparity, with (67.12%) of males feeling fairly paid compared to (55.15%) of females.

Diversity, Bias, and Anonymity

A substantial (66.89%) expressed a preference for anonymous job applications to reduce bias, with a slightly higher percentage among males (69.86%) compared to females (64.08%). Half of the respondents (50.73%) reported experiencing negative bias when applying for a job. Of those who experienced bias, the reasons varied:

  • Age-related bias: 21.14%
  • Race-related bias: 15.93%
  • Gender-related bias: 14.10%
  • Neighborhood-related bias: 3.37%
  • Other: 4.80%
Negative Bias (Other)Count
Religion1
Sexual Orientation2
Name4
Disability6
Criminal background2
Weight2

The impact of platforms such as LinkedIn and the increasing reliance on skills-based tests highlight the ever-evolving nature of the job market. Job seekers navigating this landscape must recognize the significance of maintaining an online, professional presence and continually honing their skills. The survey results showed that almost half of respondents actively explore new opportunities while already employed which underscores a widespread desire for professional growth and fulfillment. This implies that job seekers need to proactively manage their careers, staying attuned to emerging opportunities and embracing continuous learning to remain competitive in the evolving job landscape.

The unsettling prevalence of bias in job applications, including mainly age, race, gender, and even neighborhood-based discrimination, signals a pressing need for further efforts to foster inclusivity and equal opportunities. For job seekers, this underlines the importance of advocating for fair and unbiased hiring practices. As individuals pursue new opportunities, the survey's findings serve as a call to action for job seekers to be aware of potential biases in the hiring process. The overwhelming preference for anonymous job applications among respondents reflects a growing awareness among job seekers about the need to mitigate biases, signaling an opportunity for organizations to adopt more transparent recruitment processes. Job seekers can leverage these insights by seeking out companies with inclusive hiring practices and advocating for changes in industry norms.

Here are the results split by age: 

QuestionAge 18-29Age 30-44Age 45-60
Does your job typically require a degree or other professional qualification?73.21%74.28%90%
Is your degree related to your job?68.57%67.39%82%
Do you believe a degree is needed to have a well paying job?51.79%51.15%76%
Have you received job offers via LinkedIn within the last year?51.07%50.57%58%
Have you seen an increase in skills based tests when applying for jobs?57.86%61.64%70%
Are you actively looking for a new job while in full-time employment?41.43%47.70%60%
Do you feel like you are fairly paid in your current role?62.86%59.48%74%
Would you prefer for job applications to be anonymous to reduce bias?67.14%66.10%78%
Have you ever experienced negative bias when applying for a job?46.79%51.15%68%
If you have experienced negative bias, what was it related to?
Age 18-29Age 30-44Age 45-60
Age35.11%31.05%47.06%
Race29%25.93%17.65%
Gender22.90%23.93%20.59%
Neighborhood3.82%4.84%8.82%
Other5.34%8.26%2.94%

Key Findings by Age Group

Need for a Degree

Notably, there is a significant difference in the necessity of degrees across age groups. While 73.21% of respondents in the 18-29 age group believe their jobs typically require a degree, the percentage increases to 90% in the 45-60 age group. This difference suggests a potential shift in the perceived importance of formal qualifications as individuals progress in their careers. The survey also indicates that 82% of respondents aged 45-60 feel their degrees are related to their current jobs, compared to 68.57% in the 18-29 age group. This highlights a stronger alignment of qualifications with job roles among older professionals. The belief that a degree is needed for a well-paying job is evident in the 45-60 age group, with 76%, compared to 51.79% in the 18-29 age group and 51.15% in the 30-44 age group. This finding shows the evolving perspectives on the relationship between education and career success across generations.

Job Search and Bias

Respondents aged 45-60 have seen a higher percentage of job offers via LinkedIn in the last year (58%), compared to 51.07% in the 18-29 age group. This reflects the evolving role of professional networking platforms in different age segments. The survey also shows that skills-based tests in job applications increase with age, from 57.86% in the 18-29 age group to 70% in the 45-60 age group. This suggests a growing emphasis on practical skills assessment in the hiring process, especially for experienced professionals. The inclination to actively look for a new job while in full-time employment varies, with 41.43% in the 18-29 age group, 47.70% in the 30-44 age group, and 60% in the 45-60 age group. This reflects differing career stages and aspirations among age groups.

Bias and Diversity

The survey delves into experiences of negative bias during job applications. Respondents aged 45-60 report the highest incidence at 68%, with age (47.06%), race (17.65%), and gender (20.59%) being the primary factors cited. The desire for anonymous job applications as a means to reduce bias is most evident in the 45-60 age group, with 78%, compared to 67.14% in the 18-29 age group. This indicates a growing awareness of and concern for bias in the hiring process among older professionals.

Here are the results split by age and gender: 

QuestionAge 18-29 maleAge 18-29 FemaleAge 30-44 maleAge 30-44 femaleAge 45-60 maleAge 45-60 female
Does your job typically require a degree or other professional qualification?77.59%70.12%77.50%70.83%94.29%80%
Is your degree related to your job?73.28%65.24%70%64.58%88.57%66.67%
Do you believe a degree is needed to have a well paying job?58.62%46.95%52.50%49.70%80%66.67%
Have you received job offers via LinkedIn within the last year?54.31%48.78%52.78%48.21%68.57%33.33%
Have you seen an increase in skills based tests when applying for jobs?56.90%58.54%64.44%58.63%82.86%40%
Are you actively looking for a new job while in full-time employment?42.24%40.85%46.94%48.51%68.57%40%
Do you feel like you are fairly paid in your current role?71.55%56.71%64.72%53.87%77.14%66.67%
Would you prefer for job applications to be anonymous to reduce bias?69.83%65.24%68.61%63.39%82.86%66.67%
Have you ever experienced negative bias when applying for a job?39.67%51.83%53.61%48.51%68.57%66.67%

*Please drag the horizontal scroll bar to the right to further explore the content.

If you have experienced negative bias, what was it related to?
Age 18-29 maleAge 18-29 FemaleAge 30-44 maleAge 30-44 femaleAge 45-60 maleAge 45-60 female
Age41.30%31.76%35.23%25.15%54.16%30%
Race39.13%23.53%27.98%22.70%12.50%30%
Gender6.52%31.76%17.10%31.29%20.83%20%
Neighborhood4.35%3.53%4.15%5.52%8.33%10%
Other2.17%7.06%7.77%8.58%0%0%

*Please drag the horizontal scroll bar to the right to further explore the content.

Key Findings by Age and Gender

Qualifications and Job Requirements

When looking at qualifications, the survey revealed that a significant majority across all demographics admitted that their jobs typically require a degree or other professional qualification. However, the demographic of respondents that seemed to require a degree less were females aged 18-29, with 70.12% who needed a qualification. This contrasts with the highest percentage, which was among males aged 45-60, at an impressive 94.29% showing that males later in their career feel like their jobs require a degree, compared to young females. The reason for this could be down to the difference in career choices between the two demographics, with age and gender being the biggest factors.

Relevance of Degrees to Jobs

The data indicated that a substantial portion of respondents felt that there is a connection between their education and their current roles. The demographic that has the lowest percentage reporting this connection was among females aged 30-44, with 64.58%. In contrast, the highest relevance was reported by males aged 45-60, with 88.57%. This means that females aged 30-44 feel like their degree doesn’t necessarily need to be related to their job or career whereas men aged 45-60 feel like their current job role requires a degree that is relevant.

Perceptions on Salary and Job Satisfaction

When looking at salary satisfaction, the survey found a difference in contentment levels across different age and gender groups. The lowest satisfaction was reported by females aged 30-44, with 53.87%, while the highest was among males aged 45-60, with 77.14%. This shows that middle aged females feel like they are underpaid in their line of work even if they have the correct qualifications and experience. Females aged 18-29 also feel like they are underpaid with only 56.71% of respondents admitting that they are fairly paid.

Bias and Discrimination

Regarding bias in the job application process, the majority of respondents expressed a preference for anonymous job applications to reduce bias. However, a significant number reported experiencing negative bias, with age, race, and gender being primary factors. The lowest reported instances of negative bias were among males aged 18-29, with 39.67%. On the other hand, the highest percentage reporting bias was among males aged 45-60, with 68.57%. The main factor for negative bias being shown for males aged 45-60 was due to age (54.16%) which shows that the job market is evolving and a younger workforce is what companies are looking for.

Addressing Bias

In light of these findings, it becomes apparent that targeted efforts are needed to address bias-related challenges, particularly among younger females and older males. Creating awareness and implementing strategies to foster inclusivity in the workplace will contribute to a fairer and more equitable professional environment.

"These findings are not just statistics; they are narratives that reflect individuals in their professional careers. As we analyze and act upon these insights, we are poised to contribute meaningfully to the ongoing dialogue about the future of work and the collective responsibility we share in shaping it.”

In conclusion, this comprehensive survey shows that there are some big differences when it comes to the perception of the current job market across different genders and age groups. One of the main takeaways being that younger females in the age bracket of 18-29 feel like they experience the negative bias and are the most underpaid. Another key result from the survey is that the older generation, both males and females aged 45-60 feel like qualifications are essential when obtaining a well paying job compared to the younger generation who understand that a degree is not needed to get a well paying job in the current job market. It is also interesting to see that even though males aged 45-60 feel like they experience the most negative bias due to their age, they are still the main demographic that are currently looking for jobs while employed.

It is clear from the survey results that the job market is changing from generation to generation and that support is needed across the board. At CVwizard we pride ourselves on aiding the job seeker to succeed in their desired career path.

"At CVwizard, we see this survey as a catalyst for change, empowering both job seekers and employers with the knowledge needed to make informed decisions. We are committed to championing a future where talent is recognized and rewarded without prejudice, and where individuals find fulfillment and success in their chosen careers. This survey was created with the job seeker in mind with the purpose to reveal what needs to be done in the current job market so we can help amplify the voice of the job seeker and aid them in finding the right career path.”

Make an impression with your resume

Create and download a professional resume quickly and easily.